X is for X-Rated

My A-Z Challenge this year contains posts about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

Depending on where you are in the world, your country’s rating system may go up to NC-17, (U.S.) R, (Canada), 18, (U.K.) etc., but for the purposes of the A-Z Challenge I’m using the outdated rating because, well, “X.”  I’m purposely not including pornography ratings since this post relates to mainstream movie theatres. Perhaps not regardless of where you are–admittedly I haven’t done a lot of research–at least in North America, the highest ratings are normally placed on movies with sexual content. So while our Bugs Bunny is being censored all to hell, our children are encouraged to watch widespread violence but denied the act of love.

I have mixed feelings about this. Intellectually it makes little sense to me to limit the viewing of sexual acts but show willful acts of violence. On the other hand, emotionally I have issues that stem from childhood which I won’t go into. Suffice to say that I had very mixed messages growing up. On the OTHER hand, (because yes, I have three hands on this subject) there is also the question of what viewing sexual acts in the theatre will lead to at home.

With widespread (pun unintentional) access on the internet to the types of porn that isn’t even shown in adult theatres and the fact that it’s difficult to supervise our children’s internet access 24/7, the ideas they get from movies is equivalent to the concept of gateway drugs. Give ’em a taste and they’ll want an even better high.

With that in mind, I’m thinking what if they just put all the violence AND all the sex under the highest rating? What do you think?

EM is for Menstruation

My A-Z Challenge this year contains posts about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

People are going to hate me for this, but I gotta say it. The “controversy” all started with the “iconic” scene in 50 Shades of Grey where *gasp* Christian Grey removed a tampon from Ana’s down there before he mounted her. And women all over the world tittered or threw up. What. The. Fuck.

Oh but it’s so sickening! they cry. To remove a foreign object from the place a man is going to stick his dick -so what?! Is your blood diseased? Are you not clean down there? If not you might want to reconsider those tampons in the first place, ‘coz it ain’t getting any better! And guys – feeling uneasy about the idea of fucking her during her period? Consider this: get her pregnant and your kid’s comin’ outta that same hole with even MORE blood — head-first! Is that sick or what? If you can’t handle the anatomy, get the hell out of the twat!

And grow the fuck up already!

 

K is for Kink

My A-Z Challenge this year contains posts about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

There are some things I like to get a feel for when I write a scene and so I’ll read novels containing what I want to write. For example, fight scenes. I have a hard time with pacing and repetition during any scene that involves fisticuffs.

What I don’t want to get tips on from other writers–or any other resources for that matter–is kink. If my characters have an armpit fetish or belong to an exclusive club where they join in fetishistic orgies, I don’t want to know ahead of time that that particular kink is a “thing.” Kinks in fiction, in my opinion, need to be as original as possible.

I’m not sure quite what it is about this aspect of fiction – perhaps it’s the old adage that if you’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all that makes it necessary for me to keep a sex scene fresh in some way. That includes, as Mr. Wheeler said in a comment on my last post, simply alluding to the fact that it’s going to happen without actually writing it. There’s a lot to be said for leaving everything to the reader’s imagination, or most of it anyway.

Is there any particular sort of scene or part of a story that you feel needs to be as original as possible? Something such as torture, perhaps?

J is for Junk (Adult Content)

My A-Z Challenge this year contains posts about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

One of the hardest things I find when writing sex scenes is what to call everything. So many of the common words for breasts: tits, boobs, etc., for the penis: dick, member, etc., and vagina: twat, pussy and so on, not to mention the more flamboyant phrases such as heaving mounds, rock hard man-pole, and warm moist slit, usually make me want to laugh. Depending on the mood of the scene I’ll usually stick to the basics or work my way around them (without resorting to the “down there” of 50 Shades fame.) However, the one thing I consistently have a problem with is the buttocks. Bum? Ass? Lower cheeks? Nothing ever seems to fit into a sex scene for me.

What do you consider the best most serious and actually sexy way to say these things? Better yet, what makes you spit your coffee through your nose?

 

F is for Four Letter Words in Fiction

My A-Z Challenge this year contains posts about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

I’m a huge believer of truth in fiction. Which doesn’t mean to say I don’t like a completely made-up story but rather that what’s important is the world and the characters within the world of a fictional tale need to stay true to themselves.

For example, a story I’m currently writing takes place within the confines of a city bus, in a real city in the real world in which we all live. Any and every conceivable character could ride on that bus; all shapes, ages, levels of intelligence, all with various degrees of respect. In order to stay true to my setting, I feel I must include characters whom I find distasteful – characters who swear, tell fart jokes, and are generally abrasive and disrespectful.

The same often occurs within the setting of a novel. Especially in dialogue, this can be a challenge when, for example, it becomes necessary to include a character who habitually uses a certain word. Like “fuck.” Everyone has come across someone whose speech regularly includes, “fuck this, fuckin’ fuck that, fuckin’ whatever fuck” throughout every conversation they have. I actually have someone living in my basement like this, so I’m intimately familiar with this behaviour. (No, I can’t just get rid of him. I gave birth to him.)  When writing such a character into a novel which you hope will come out as a literary masterpiece, how do you balance such a character’s dialogue? It’s a toughie. Same as with what I call “ummers”–people who say “um” after every third word. There ARE people who do this, it’s true. But try reading it – it’s annoying!

Have you ever come across characters in stories where this sort of dialogue was handled well… or not?

 

 

B is for “Blow Me,” and Other Onomatopoeia

My A-Z Challenge this year is about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

Over the years I’ve discovered that there are tricks to writing tantalizing sex scenes. First is not employing overused phrases like “engorged member” and “heaving bosom.” Let’s face it, they’ve been done to death and thus have become fodder for ridicule. Inspiring an eye roll from a reader is more anti-erotic than titillating. So what is erotic?

The second thing on my personal list of how to write a good sex scene is subtlety. There’s really nothing worse than the feeling that you’re reading an organ owner’s manual. i.e. Her bosom heaving, she grasped his engorged member and rubbed it. Then…

No. Just no. Step by step instructions don’t work for anyone with experience. So unless you’re writing specifically for virgins, I’d suggest allowing the reader to use his or her own imagination. Think of it this way – your target audience likely knows what they’re doing even with the lights off. They don’t need you to show up with a megawatt spotlight and a bullhorn to ruin it all for them. Rewriting the previous example with this in mind; With a deep exhalation she reached down and took him in her hand, stroking and guiding…  You get the picture, right? And if you don’t, you’re probably too young to be reading this. Go away.

The third and final point–and the one for which this post is titled–is onomatopoeia. For those of you who have grown a distance from grade six grammar, onomatopoeia is “the use of words whose sound suggests the sense.”* Depending on the softness or the urgency of the sex scene in question, there are just some words that sound better; that roll off the tongue and slip easily into place. “Blow me,” for instance comes across better as a whisper, whereas the phrase “suck it” has the sharp consonants that depict more of a demand. Shorter sentences provide a sense of breathlessness as the scene progresses toward its climax.

These are but a few techniques which, subtle in and of themselves, separate the passages that have a reader reaching for a fan from the ones that have ’em running for the toilet before they pee themselves with laughter. There’s an art to writing an effective sex scene. When you read one, you know it. Writing them takes practice, like anything. Like sex itself.

*Merriam Webster online

 

A is for … Ahem

My A-Z Challenge this year is about writing adult content in fiction – you will not find any adult fiction within the parameters of the challenge, except for illustration purposes.

At the risk of scaring off any potential readers of my A-Z Challenge, I want to start by talking about something that’s been on my mind for a while. I thought, very briefly, about writing the subject of this post in the title but I realize though people may want to read my blog, they surely don’t want anyone looking over their shoulder, seeing it in nice big letters. Are you ready? Here we go.

Anal fisting. So that you know which page I’m on, let me first say, “EWW.” I’d never have brought it up, nor would I have contemplated such a thing had it not been for E.L. James of 50 Shades of Grey fame. Just imagine if Ana had said, “Oh my!” in a positive rather than a negative way when it came to that little proposition? I mean seriously, what better way to say I love you than to let you stuff your hand up my poop-hole? But will you still care for me when I’m wearing Depends at the age of 30? NO, Ana. NO he won’t! But still, it’s sooo romantic, isn’t it?

Okay, I hold no judgement over people who are actually into this stuff. What you do in the sanctity of your own space is entirely up to you. But I don’t want details, thanks. I dread the idea that I might actually accidentally come across pictures on the internet… one of the main reasons I fear getting viruses on my computer.

I can promise you, you will never see any of my character get their rear-end cherries popped unless it is during the most horrific rape scene during which I will be cringing in a corner denying the fact that I’m writing while my bad guy does the deed. I don’t want to write about it and I certainly don’t want to read about it. When I come across such things as anal play in sex scenes I skim the words until I figure it’s safe to start reading again – but that’s just where I draw the line.

Everyone has their own literary lines in the sand. What’s yours?

A – Z April Challenge – It’s A Theme!

I can blame my post of yesterday (Perverts and Weirdos) for helping me decide on a theme for A-Z April 2015. When I signed up I went with the “Adult Content” classification just in case. I didn’t want to be blacklisted. Turns out it was a good idea.

My theme for this year’s A-Z will be, basically, adult content in fiction. This will include posts about writing sex scenes, reading sex scenes, writing about the objectionable things that characters do and say and what makes us hate certain characters for their actions. I’d also like to touch on the controversies surrounding ratings; what is appropriate for certain audiences, trigger warnings etc.

There are so many uncharted waters for today’s writers in these regards. Don’t get me wrong – I’m no expert. I hope that whatever research I do in order to write accurate articles for this A-Z April Challenge will teach me a thing or two as well. Aside from learning things I’ll be including a good deal of my own opinions.

This should be fun! I hope you’ll join me!